Oil Check Oregon

Oil industry drops clean fuels ballot but preps for election season

This could mean that the oil industry is simply not willing to give up, but their past history shows a different strategy. Over the last 3 elections, fossil fuel companies have put nearly $8 million into Oregon. The numbers for the first quarter of 2016 are still being finalized, but oil industry PACs have already put together tens of thousands of dollars in preparation for this year’s election.

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Oregon passes pioneering coal bill, but it didn’t come easy

Is Intel fighting to keep Oregon hooked on coal?

Rare political form: Everyone agrees coal is bad for Oregon

But unlike these other efforts Oregon has a chance to take a major step forward in addressing pollution this session. Transitioning utilities towards clean energy has the potential to be a huge win for a state that’s been struggling to reduce its emissions and has had a history of lingering; costly legislative fights on energy policy.

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Oregon preps to finally curb pollution, here’s how the oil industry will fight it

"...all this money and influence seems to be in an effort to gum up the state’s political process and delay Oregon’s transition to cleaner energy sources."

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Oregon might get off coal completely, that would put them in some pretty good company

Oregon is set to step out ahead with its own voice on this discussion. Our state still gets about 30% of its energy from coal. Its harmful for health and its increasingly becoming a drastically expensive option to maintain. But it isn’t something the state has to be stuck with forever. Countries and states around the world have shown that a coal-free future works and Oregon can lead by being the first place to vote on choosing that future for its self.

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Oil and coal's $20 million campaign for influence in the Northwest

Through a web of direct donations, PAC contributions, and lobbying expenditures, fossil fuel interests have sought to block, delay and roll back popular protections for clean air and the environment.

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Oil Check and Sightline discuss Shell in the Arctic, Exxon's climate coverup and PDX's oil train fight

The 3 major victories Oregon won on the environment this week

It has been a big week for environmental news in the Northwest. We saw three major victories for shifting our region towards a clean energy economy. These all came from completely different sides of the equation but make no mistake they are all tied to loosening oil and coal’s grip on our future.

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Oil's California playbook: the arguments you should expect

Here in the Northwest, we’ve recently passed impressive climate legislation of our own. Both states’ look poised to put a price on pollution. But make no mistake; the oil industry will do everything they can to stop it.

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Asia is not coal's deus ex machina

The notion that people in Seoul and Brusan, Shanghai and Guangzhou don’t care about pollution is a myopic view. These aren’t just engines of endless growth fueled by energy. These are real people with the same desires for healthy productive lives as anyone in Seattle, Omaha or Boston. And they’ve made it clear coal is their past, not their future.

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The Northwest is falling behind on pollution

Northeast state’s like Maryland might be better know for “Crab Cakes and Football” but right now they are running up the score on us in curbing pollution.

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Leaked: The Oil Lobby's Conspiracy to Kill Off California's Climate Law

"Bloomberg's business week gives us a glimpse into oil industry practices and what we can expect in Oregon. Reporter Brad Weiners says it best: "[I]t’s not paranoia if they really are out to delay, rewrite, or kill off a meaningful effort to reduce the build-up of carbon in the Earth’s atmosphere. A Powerpoint deck now being circulated by climate activists—a copy of which was sent to Bloomberg Businessweek—suggests that there is a conspiracy. Or, if you prefer, a highly coordinated, multistate coalition that does not want California to succeed at moving off fossil fuels because that might set a nasty precedent for everyone else."

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